Authenticity. Brands, fakes, spin and the lust for real life

Branding

Ioana da semne bune in Vesti. Mai multe o sa vedeti luni, azi avem un preview: recenzie pentru cartea lui David Boyle “Authenticity…”.

Codul T136 din Biblioteca Friends ascunde o lucrare semnata de David Boyle si numita “Authenticity. Brands, fakes, spin and the lust for real life” (in traducere, probabil, “Autenticitate” – ramane de vazut, pentru ca inca nu s-a tradus in limba romana).”
O recenzie din “New Consumer” spunea despre cartea lui Boyle, Authenticity ca este “un manifest pentru cei deziluzionati…oferind revansa si alinare celor care se lupta cu acceptarea societatii moderne cea hegemonica, cu arome artificiale, imbibata de PR si adoratoare de vedete”. Hmm…
Boyle descrie nasterea si dezvoltarea unei noi tendinte (sau “trendinte” cum se mai spune) – pro-autenticitate, pro-local si deci anti-globalista, o tendinta ce (in 2003 cand a aparut cartea) “promite sa ne spulbere conceptiile despre globalizare si virtualizare”. Mai putin manifest si mai mult analiza deci, cu o doza de protest, ce-i drept. Daca George Ritzer scria, exact cu o decada inaintea lui David Boyle, tot impotriva globalizarii, consumerismului si mcdonaldizarii societatii, exact acelasi curent de gandire strabate si “Authenticity”. Aici el are un nume – Noul Realism, si o serie de caracteristici comune celor ce, nefiind convinsi de “visul corporatist” sau de “mirajul globalizarii”, sunt din ce in ce mai atrasi de “mancarea adevarata”, “cultura adevarata”, “politica adevarata”….si asa mai departe. Noii Realisti, care uneori mananca junk food, dar isi apara dreptul la o alternativa “autentica”, sunt din ce in ce mai multi, si cu toate astea, afirma Boyle, se simt singuri. Popularitatea crescanda a marcilor locale, a cluburilor de lectura, a legumelor organice, a miscarii “slow food”, a modei vintage este un semn al nevoii de interactiuni si experiente reale, face-to-face, individuale.
Alte cateva idei interesante:
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Noul realism nu e miscare conservatoare – desi exista si cateva elemente de acest tip, dar e o tendinta evolutiva care cauta sa adapteze intelepciunea traditionala pentru viata moderna
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E o revolutie progresiva: produsele culinare internationale de pe rafturile supermarketurilor puteau sa satisfaca nevoile de autenticitate acum 10 ani insa astazi consumatorii cauta produse locale, sanatoase si reale.
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Ideea de autenticitate in raport cu brandurile este complexa: brandurile locale sunt greu de “inghitit” de catre cele globale, capitalul lor de imagine fiind construit pe baze solide, greu de distrus; de aceea giganti bancari precum HBSC afirma ca sunt “banca ta locala”
O multime de exemple si studii de caz vin sa sustina aceste idei si sa demonstreze ca intr-adevar consumatorii au puterea si daca indeajuns de multi oameni cer ceva, il vor obtine. De aceea “Noii realisti” impun (si din 2003 de la aparitia cartii lui Boyle se vede cu siguranta asta) o revolutie in structura si modelele de branding si business.

Răspunsuri

  • Anonymous

    O intrebare : Daca nu este un blog oficial, al agentiei,de ce la adresa data raspunde cineva de la PR (plin de amabilitate, specifica celor care lucreaza aici).
    De ce nu raspund cei care scriu pe blog ?

    iara_popescu

  • The Everybody + all the close friends of Jacques Yves Cousteau

    Salut,

    Sincer, as fi preferat un comentariu al articolului pe care tocmai l-am postat. Tu ai citit cartea recomandata de Ioana? Cum ti s-a parut?
    Daca nu ai apucat sa o citesti, o poti imprumuta din biblioteca FRIENDS.

    Cat despre raspunsuri si cine si ce raspunde, sa ne zici daca ai primit vreun raspuns care nu te-a multumit. Daca mai ai nevoie de detalii, ne zici si putem sa iti raspundem pe rand, toti cei din redactia The Fishington Post. Pana la urma poate unul dintre noi va nimeri un raspuns multumitor :) .

  • Anonymous

    Legat de biblioteca FRIENDS. Cartile se pot imprumuta si in format digitat (scanate, pdf, etc)?

    Care sunt formalitatiile, pentru a putea imprumuta carti?

    Cred ca am fost inteleasa gresit. Doamna Monica, de la PR, a fost foarte amabila, si de fiecare data a raspuns prompt la intrebarile adresate. Fiind un blog neoficial, am simtit ca deranjez, gandind ca dansa are foarte multe pe cap, si numai de intrebarile sau nelamuririle mele nu are timp.

    Toate raspunsurile au fost OK.

    O zi buna.

    iara_popescu

  • The Everybody + all the close friends of Jacques Yves Cousteau
  • Anonymous

    Super carte.

    Authenticity: Brands, Fakes, Spin and the Lust for Real Life – David Boyle

    “Amusing and sharply observed… Boyle’s is a beguiling vision of hope for the future.”
    Time Out
    “A manifesto for the disillusioned … This book provides vindication and comfort for those who struggle to accept the PR-soaked, artificially flavoured, celebrity-deifying hegemony of modern society.”
    New Consumer

    The emergence of a powerful new trend – pro-local, pro-authentic – looks set to overturn all our conventional assumptions about globalisation and virtualisation. Authenticity tracks the emergence of the New Realists – possibly up to 50 per cent of the population of the UK – who are not convinced by corporate technologists and globalizers, and are increasingly committed to real food, real culture, real politics, real schools, real community, real medicine, real culture, real stories…
    Although we have been told for the past 40 years that technological and virtual solutions would drive out the rest – that we would soon have food in pill form or learn only from computer terminals – the reality is the reverse.
    But ironically, although there are large numbers of New Realists – who may eat fast food sometimes but will defend their right to an authentic option with increasing passion – most of them believe they are almost alone.
    The rise of local brands, real ale, reading groups, organic vegetables, slow food, poetry recitals, unmixed music, materiality in art and unbranded vintage fashions, are all symptoms of the same thing – a demand for human-scale, face-to-face institutions and real experience. It also means:
    • New realism is not a conservative force – though there are elements of that – but a forward-looking movement that looks to adapt traditional wisdom for modern life.
    • It is a progressive revolution: cosmopolitan foods from all over the world on our supermarket shelves were able to satisfy people’s demands for authenticity a generation ago, but now people are increasingly demanding what’s local, healthy and real.
    • The idea of authenticity has been hi-jacked by the advertisers, and although Young & Rubicam recently claimed that brands are the new religion – the source of authenticity in people’s lives – the opposite is actually true: brands disappoint. That’s why the big global brands are trying so hard to buy up the local ones, and why banking giants like HSBC claim they are ‘the local bank’.
    • What enough people demand, they will get: the New Realists look set to drive a revolution in the structure and methods of business.

    Stefan Dima

  • Anonymous

    Continuare -

    Living in an Artificial World

    Extract from Chapter 1 of Authenticity
    We have come through a period of unprecedented prosperity and aggressive certainty, ushered in by the end of the Cold War and the internet revolution. We have been told endlessly that the future is going to be overwhelmingly global and gloriously virtual, and that the two strands are intricately related. We have seen the pictures of rabbis in black robes with ringlets, putting their mobile phones up to Jerusalem's Wailing Wall so that relatives in New York could pray. We have read about the call centre staff in India who are given detailed lessons in the niceties of Eastenders, so they can exchange chit-chat with callers ringing about gas leaks in Weybridge. We've probably talked to them ourselves without knowing it. The recession may have slowed down the 'inevitable' progress towards a virtual world, but we most of us accept that globalisation is with us for good.Yet that ubiquitous trend has begun to spawn its opposite, and – although the demand for the real is barely showing itself above the horizon yet – it has already begun to make itself felt in many different areas of cultural life, from poetry to politics and from food to fashion. It is beginning to be clear that the dominant cultural force of the century ahead won't just be global and virtual, it will actually be a powerful interweaving of both opposite drives – globalisation and localisation, virtual and real, with an advance guard constantly undermining what is packaged and drawing the rest of society along behind them.
    The New Realists increasingly want 'real' food – maybe organic – that tastes of something, doesn't involve the genes of fish for temperature control, and comes from a real place somewhere on the map. They don't want the kind of consumables leached of flavour and interest in the form of pills or tubes that the experts used to tell us represented the future of food because the Apollo and Gemini astronauts used them.
    They want real sound of people working, not the fake recorded mutter that the BBC shelled out £2,300 in 2000 when they worried that their accounts department was too quiet.
    Or the fake smells that London Underground tried in their tunnels the same year.
    Or the fake places that all look the same, with the same global storefronts in every town and city around the world, in the cheapest international style of glass and concrete.
    Or fake politicians whose slightest utterance is tested before focus groups and scripted, and who – like George W. Bush – even have the word "Wow!" on the teleprompter.
    Or the fake relationships people create online, never having to meet, using fake names – sometimes even breaking up real flesh-and-blood relationships in the process.
    Or fake community activity, like the Holiday Bowling Lanes in New London, Connecticut, which social theorist Robert Putnam describes in his book Bowling Alone, with giant TV screens above each lane, where the players never talk to each other between turns, but just stare sadly upwards.
    Or the kind of world where, except for the very rich, most of us will have to rely on virtual bankers, virtual doctors, virtual pharmacists, virtual carers and virtual teachers.
    That's not to say that there's no market for internet chat rooms, Pot Noodle, NHS Online – or George W. Bush for that matter. There clearly is. But there's also a growing suspicion of a world where we don't have to see people or touch anything, and a longing for something we can't quite put our fingers on. Just how big that market is, I'll discuss later – but what large numbers of people in the Western economy want, they tend to get.
    It's a key reason that so many people are starting, in the media equivalent of a dim light, to feel around them for something firm to grasp."

    Stefan Dima

  • Anonymous

    Real Food
    Extract from Chapter 4 of Authenticity
    For some reason, one of my main memories about Apollo 11 – and the tin can with the computing power of a Mini Metro that actually took them to the moon – was their food. There it was, that famous meal of beef and vegetables in a translucent plastic pack, which would turn to soft mush when they added a little hot water. This was the future of food, we were all told in those heady days of technological hope. All that fancy stuff we used to eat would soon be a thing of the past – if boiled cabbage and bangers could be described as fancy stuff. All meals would soon come in tubes or plastic bags, without fuss or effort.
    It was also a labour-saving dream of course, and to that extent a feminist one. And with the arrival of serious fast food in the UK in the early 1970s, it seemed all too inevitable.
    The following year, the presenters of the BBC programme Tomorrow's World – Raymond Baxter and James Burke, both familiar faces from moonshot commentating – published a vision of what Britain would be like in 2120. In some ways, it looks surprisingly accurate 30 years on. We do have virtual reality. We do now use cathedrals as concert halls, and we do have a minister responsible for leisure. We don't have mass traquillisation in the water supply, but with television, maybe we don't need it. This is how they saw the inevitable future of food: "Much of the food available will be based on protein substitutes and, as with a book club today, a family will contract with a company to supply it with part-cooked daily menus which will be delivered once a month in disposable vacuum packs. The most complicated dish will need only a few seconds under a microwave heater to make it ready for the table. As a result of this development, modern homes will no longer have kitchens for food preparation, and the resulting saving in space on a national scale will provide room for a million and a half extra full-sized living units."
    But 30 years on from Apollo, it hasn't happened like that. There is fake food in abundance – anything from Pot Noodle to Dunkin' Donuts. We do buy ready meals in their plastic-packaged millions, but it's pretty clear that the culture is also going another way entirely. We are not seeing the last gasp of authentic eating in a flurry of what used to be called 'analogue' food – the word 'artificial' was thought to frighten people. We're not embracing the brave new world of artificial smells, artificial tastes and artificial consistency.
    Quite the reverse. Organic food is enjoying an explosion of interest on both sides of the Atlantic. Cookery TV programmes and cookery books are some of the most popular. Farmers markets, stuffed with fresh produce straight from the farm, are popping up in towns and cities all over the country. London has probably the most cosmopolitan set of restaurants in the world. The Campaign for Real Ale has transformed our drinking habits. It's not that the market for fast food has somehow disappeared – it clearly hasn't – but there is a growing demand for what is authentic, local and trustworthy.

    Stefan Dima

  • Anonymous

    Real Relationships
    Extract from Chapter 8 of Authenticity
    The most recent vision of the future written by Microsoft's enigmatic founder Bill Gates, [email protected] speed of thought includes a strange piece of nostalgia about dating a woman who lived somewhere else. Gates describes how they spent time together on email, because they were too busy actually to meet. "We figured out a way we could sort of go to the movies together," he writes. "We would find a film that was playing about the same time in both our cities. We would drive to our respective theatres, chatting on our cellular phones. We would watch the movies and on the way home we would use our cellular phones again to discuss the show."
    He goes onto promise that this kind of 'virtual dating' will be better when it's combined with video-conferencing. This is an odd story because Gates shows no signs that he understands that this virtual dating is a pretty miserable business compared to the real thing. As Howard Rheingold of the WELL network says, "you can't kiss anybody" in virtual communities – however wonderful the virtual kiss.
    This is a blindness shared by many of the cheerleaders of the virtual revolution, with the notable exception of Jaron Lanier who believes the new technologies must help people engage more closely, rather than to escape from each other – and to prove the point, he doesn't 'disengage' with drugs, alcohol or chocolate either. But few virtual writers accept that there's a qualitative difference, for example between real and virtual teachers.
    We hear, for example, that providing more computers in schools is the most important imperative for the educational world – which is why schools are cutting back on arts and music to provide them. Especially in the USA, after the Clinton administration's determination to make computers "as much part of the classroom as blackboards". We even hear about virtual examiners. The New Jersey-based Educational Testing Service now uses 'e-raters' to mark G-MAT test essays for entry to graduate management courses. Actually the way forward for education, says the philosopher Theodore Roszak, is to "find out what Bill Gates wants schools to do and don't do it."
    Of course there should be computers in schools. Children need to be proficient in computing, and computers can help them study by themselves and find out information for themselves. But they can't ever be a substitute for the kind of real education that can take place in the meeting of minds between pupil and teacher. That may not happen often enough – and it's a difficult alchemy to create in our monstrous factory schools – but that isn't the point. Computer education by itself is push-button, relationship-less education, and that is infinitely poorer because it is less human."

    Stefan Dima

  • Anonymous

    Authenticity Wars
    Extract from Chapter 11 of Authenticity
    We seem to be on the threshold of a new kind of humanism, that again judges the authenticity of things and ideas by whether or not they are human-scale, or enhance direct contact between humans, or made by fallible humans for fallible humans – rather than trying to squeeze humans into whatever shape is most convenient for the factory, machine or computer. It's a humanism that respects minute irregularities because they are a sign of human manufacture, and respect the energy that comes from artefacts made by hand.
    The highest wisdom is to know yourself, said Erasmus. For the new humanists and the old, that's the key to everything – to go beyond virtual systems that can't recreate the complexity of the human spirit.
    It's a new attitude that's discernable behind all this demand for authenticity – a new way of approaching business or culture or politics that's rooted in a very old way – and one that is tolerant of human failings. This isn't a humanism that puts mankind on a pedestal that people can never live up to, or which believes that humanity's shining light is so thrilling that no other species on the planet counts at all. It sees people as rooted in tradition and community and nature, as part of our humanity. That's the great truth at the heart of New Realism.
    So authenticity may mean natural or beautiful, it may mean rooted geographically or morally, but behind all that it means human. It means that the full complexity of people are recognised, that their need for human contact is recognised, that their uniqueness and individuality is recognised too. And that seems to me to be an exciting prospect, not least because the old medieval humanism led to an explosion of art and understanding that levered civilisation out of medieval brutality. We need a similar Renaissance today.

    Stefan Dima

  • Anonymous

    The New Renaissance
    Extract from Chapter 12 of Authenticity
    At the same time, we have also seen the emergence of an articulate but growing minority of the population who are rejecting the idea that the unstoppable march of progress meant a fake, second-rate world and are demanding something authentic – real human contact, real experience, real connection. They don't just want authenticity – this is no puritanical return: they want to enjoy getting drunk occasionally, they want fast food when it's convenient, and they certainly want to use the internet. But they don't want that to be their only choice. They want something authentic to go back to.
    Their demand for reality is partly in response to the failure of these technocratic dreams, but also partly because some of them have been so successful – the rise of personal computers, fast food and food additives, for example – that they fear for their grip on reality. They are the living embodiment of Robert Nozick's prediction: 'In a virtual world, we'll be longing for reality even more'.

    Sper ca am reusit sa va starnesc curiozitatea pentru aceasta carte.

    Stefan Dima

  • Anonymous

    Un site super calumea -
    http://adsoftheworld.com/

    Andra

  • artasiprecizie

    Stefan,
    Sar'mana mult.